Turret – Church and Public Clock Repair

Church clocks, public clocks, turret clocks, master and slave clocks.

 

Our turret clock depatment have decades of experience covering almost every aspect of public clock repair, restoration and conservation. They have worked on such well known clocks as:

 

Salisbury cathedral

 

repair and maintainance of the 1386 turret clock – the world’s oldest working clock.

 

Palace of Westminster

 

Manufacture of a temporary drive unit to run the hands whilst the clock underwent repair and restoration.

 

Manchester and Leeds town hall clocks

 

Both requiring significant overhaul and repair.

 

Needless to say, we work on a great many smaller and less well known clocks – the clock and dial of Stamford School (illustrated below) is typical of many smaller jobs.

 

Conservation

 

our policy is at all times to adhere to the highest possible conservation requirements. We use fully equiped workshops and are capable of wheel and pinion cutting, castings, dial restoration etcetera…

 

Automatic winding.

 

Our winding units are designed to remove the chore of manual winding of turret clocks. Compact and powerful, they can be fitted to most clocks and carillions. In the event of power failure, the clock will continue to run for up to twelve hours.

 

Automatic Regulation.

 

Once a turret clock has been wound and set, a small weekly loss or gain can accumulate over a period of time to an unacceptable level of inccuracy. With our auto-regulators, the clock is kept to wihin 30 seconds of exact time

 

A heavy-duty auto-winder – relieving owners of the onerous task of winding the clock once a week!

 

 

Dial Restoration

 

We are usually able to remove dials with rope work rather than scaffolding, enabling dial restoration to be undertaken in our workshops and the finished item returned and put back to suit.

 

We have restored metal, glass and wooden dials, working in a sympathetic style and using 24 carat gold to recreate missing gilding.

 

Below is the dial for Stamford School clock, before and after restoration:

 

 

Before - a non-original shade of blue and hands/ numerals painted with gold paint. Note also the paintes had omitted the last I of VII.

Before – a non-original shade of blue and hands/ numerals painted with gold paint. Note also the paintes had omitted the last I of VII.

After - back to the original base colour and the hands / numerals gilded in 22 carat gold, as they should be.

After – back to the original base colour and the hands / numerals gilded in 22 carat gold, as they should be.